Coming Out of the Rough

John Gaw Meem was a “BMOC”: a busy man on campus. There are many examples of Meem’s architectural designs on the campus of the University of New Mexico including the acclaimed Zimmerman Library. He largely promoted, some might say invented, the Pueblo Revival style of architecture common in the Southwest. Tucked away on the UNM…

Landmarks of the Española Valley — 28th Annual Tour

    October 24 was a beautiful New Mexico fall day, and about 40 people enjoyed the perfect weather for the New Mexico Architectural Foundation’s 28th Annual Architectural Tour. This year we explored the Landmarks of the Española Valley.  This is a historically significant region about 90 miles north of Albuquerque. The valley was the home of several…

Discussions on Community Partnerships

During the Foundation’s annual architectural tour of the Landmarks of  Española Valley on Oct. 24, participants will learn how community partnerships have helped ensure these historic structures are preserved for future generations. >> 2015 Annual Architecture Tour registration information >> The following individuals will be the featured presenters for each tour location. Francisco Guillermo “Willie” Atencio…

Remembering Van Dorn Hooker

The Foundation’s Executive Committee sadly notes the passing of the organization’s first president and longtime supporter Van Dorn Hooker, Jr. on June 14, 2015. We offer heartfelt condolences to his surviving children, Ann Hooker Clarke and John Hooker, and his grandchildren. Van Dorn Hooker was a charter member and continued to be active with the…

2008 Architectural Tour Revisited: Bandelier National Monument

  In 2008, the New Mexico Architectural Foundation conducted its annual tour in commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of the New Deal and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). In addition to a visit to the Old Santa Fe Trail Building, participants toured CCC Historic District at Bandelier National Monument. Bandelier National Monument protects over 33,000…

An ode to New Mexico’s historic preservation and regionalism

The desire to recruit and educate a future generation capable of and passionate about conserving New Mexico’s, the nation’s, and the world’s outstanding cultural heritage, while creating new regionally-responsive design, led to the creation of the University of New Mexico’s School of Architecture and Planning‘s program in Historic Preservation and Regionalism (HPR). By engaging contemporary…